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announcements team member spotlight

Introducing Kim Louise

Introducing Kim Louise

December 21, 2021

Today we could not be more pleased to introduce the third of three new editors on The Good Life Review Team, Kim Louise!

Kim joins us as an editor on the stage & screen team as of Issue #6. She holds an MFA in Writing from the University of Nebraska and an MS from Drake University. Her plays have been part of the Metropolitan Community College touring play series, Dia de Los Muertos-Verbal Ofrenda celebration, and produced as part of the Union for Contemporary Art Centering the Margins series. 

Kim’s play Umarage was part of a trio of plays nominated for Best Original Play for Omaha Arts and Entertainment Award. She is a resident artist in the Great Plains Theater Commons. Currently, Kim is a contributing playwright in the Pursuing Legacy Series sponsored by the Union for Contemporary Art.

When we asked Kim to tell us some unique, fun, or quirky detail about herself, she told us that she suspects she may have been Mothra in a former life. Very curious… we think a follow-up question is needed.

Welcome to the Good Life Miss Kim! We hope you enjoy every minute of working with us and reading some incredible scripts!!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team

PS. More about all of our editors can be found on our masthead.

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interviews

Author Q & A with Adam Graham

Author Q & A with Adam Graham

December 16, 2021

This week’s Author Q&A is with Adam Graham. Adam is a writer and artist based in Asheville, North Carolina. His work is rooted in the complexities and dynamics of relationships and explores issues of social class, identity, and the role language plays as both a force of connectivity and a force of disintegration. His flash fiction story “On Art, Authority, and Crows: A Modern Fable” appears in our latest issue of The Good Life Review.

We asked Adam to tell us some unique or surprising detail about the origin, drafting, and/or final version of his story. 

His Response: “My process of writing is very much influenced by the cut-up techniques of the Dadaist. I begin each story by randomly selecting a smattering of texts and typing them into my document in no particular order. These random texts may be a sentence from a car insurance magazine, a phrase from an old song, the small print from a medicine commercial, that sort of thing. These segments of text, and the ideas they envelop, act as a series of sequential destinations my emerging story travels through as I write from one text to the next. This process demands a very open flow, in which free association between ideas is paramount.

“At the end of the process, I extract the originating found texts, and what remains are bizarre little tinkering literary machines that buzz across a table-top for a few minutes. Because of the extraction of the originating texts, there are “gaps” in my stories, openings built into the very foundations of the stories, missing places in the boundary the delineates the story at its very core. These openings in the story allow things to drift in and out, to cross the border of the story, it opens up the circuitry of the literary machines. 

“The found texts I used for the current story, On Art, Authority, and Crows: A Modern Fable, come from the Time-Life Library of Art, a series of biographies of various artists in history. The set of twenty-eight books was published in the 1960s.”

The other question that Adam elected to answer is what he thinks of when he hears the phrase “The Good Life?” 

Adam’s Response: “To me, the “good life” consists of artistic experimentation, of having the courage to think dangerously, of making time to build new concepts in one’s own head, and then to bring these new ideas into the world via the written word, maybe in the form of a short story, or maybe a poem, or maybe even a single sentence smudged on the bathroom mirror.  I find I feel most alive when a new idea is wriggling through my mind, slowly taking form as the flotsam and jetsam of thoughts, experience, random bits of psychological association stick to the bourgeoning form crawling out of my head.”


Thanks, Adam, for being a part of our autumn issue and for participating in this Q & A!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team

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announcements team member spotlight

Introducing Tana Buoy

Introducing Tana Buoy

December 10, 2021

Today we are excited to introduce the second of three new editors on The Good Life Review Team, Tana Buoy!

Tana joins us as an editor on the flash fiction team as of Issue #6. She received her MFA in Writing from the University of Nebraska in July of this year which just happened to coincide with her BIG move from Norfolk, Nebraska to the city of Lincoln. Tana currently tutors English, History, and Geography for Northeast Community College.

When she isn’t tutoring, Tana is jotting down micro fiction on sticky notes, dabbling in photography, and reading scary books to her two cats. She has an impressive bookshelf that is home to many horror novels and is currently working diligently on the first draft of her own book, set in the Sandhills of Nebraska. 

When we asked Tana to tell us some unique, fun, or quirky detail about herself, she told us that she is an avid list maker (which we admire) and also confessed that she trips a lot, and not in a fun way. 

Welcome to the Good Life Tana! We are thrilled that you’ve agreed to join us on this adventure and are looking forward to working with you!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team

PS. More about all of our editors can be found on our masthead.

Categories
interviews

Author Q & A with Christi Krug

Author Q & A with Christi Krug

December 8, 2021

This week’s Author Q&A is with Christi Krug. Christi has been a community educator in Vancouver, Washington since 1997 and she is also and a creativity and mindfulness coach. Her piece appearing in this issue of The Good Life Review is a nonfiction essay titled “The Coats in Summer People.” 

We asked Christi to tell us some unique or surprising detail about the origin, drafting, and/or final version of her essay. 

Her Response: “I was working as a human resources temp many years ago, chatting with a co-worker about my new pursuit of hiking. She was a hiker too, but there was one situation that had given her pause. It was a hot day in July and a man in a thick down jacket came down the trail and she felt unsafe. “Anyone who wears a coat like that in summer – you just know there’s something wrong,” she said. Until she spoke those words aloud, I had never realized how awkward and embarrassed and sad I felt about the clothing choices of my mother and brother. The remark stayed in my mind until a couple of years ago when I used it for what I call “wildwriting” – writing all my thoughts fast. Leafing through my notebook earlier this year, I liked the piece and decided to revise and submit it.”

We then asked what she learned (about herself or craft or the world) through writing and revising the essay?

Her Response: “Writing this piece, I learned that the younger me, still in there somewhere, feels a lot of shame and confusion about my early years with a mentally ill family. There is also a great deal of guilt that I didn’t develop their diagnosis and a longing for their recovery. And under all those layers is my love for my biological mother, who is no longer alive, and for my sensitive, smart, older brother.”

And finally, we asked Christi if she has any exciting projects she’s working on or something she’d like to promote. She let us know that she frequently facilitates 20 minute “wildwriting” sessions via zoom audio Zoom (no screens) and participants follow intriguing prompts in order to make all kinds of discoveries on the page. She has several lined up for December and anyone interested in attending should reach out to her via her website www.christikrug.com.

In addition, in January she will be facilitating “Wildfire Writing,” which she’s been teaching for 23 years. The class shares the practice that has helped her write with confidence while processing her life stories, harvesting their beauty. It is a distance-learning class available through Clark College and anyone interested can learn more or signup here.

Christi’s poetry and prose have appeared in everything from religious magazines to horror anthologies to comic zines. Her latest stories appear in Griffel, Nightingale & Sparrow, Montana Mouthful, and Luna Station Quarterly. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee and recently served as writer-in-residence at North Cascades Institute. Christi is the author of Burn Wild: A Writer’s Guide to Creative Breakthrough. If you want to get in touch www.christikrug.com


Thanks, Christi, for being a part of our 5th issue and for participating in this Q & A!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team

Categories
announcements team member spotlight

Introducing Michelle Pierce Lyles

Introducing Michelle Pierce Lyles

December 3, 2021

With the release of our fifth issue last month we announced that The Good Life Review is growing and adding three new editors to our existing staff. We could not be more pleased to introduce Michelle Pierce Lyles who is joining us as a poetry editor. 

When we first began this endeavor, part of our intent was to create a literary journal that would be edited and operated by fellow graduates and candidates of the University of Nebraska MFA in Writing program. Michelle is no exception to that rule. In addition to holding that degree, she is a non-profit organization board member and teaching facilitator who has conducted creative writing workshops for urban youth and has also led other writing events.

Being partially mute in her early childhood led her to ‘word gathering’, which was partnered with an intense study of written and verbal word expression. She currently resides in eastern Nebraska and credits her husband and daughters for providing unending support on her journey as a writer.

One of the things we ask all of our editors is to provide us with some unique, fun, or quirky detail about them that we can share with our readers. In addition to being a poet, Michelle is an avid knitter and so her tagline on the masthead is:  She never met a ball of yarn she didn’t like.

Welcome, Michelle! We are excited to have you on the team and hope that you absolutely love working with us!!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team

PS. More about all of our editors can be found on our masthead.

Categories
announcements

2021 Pushcart Prize Nominations

2021 Pushcart Prize Nominations

November 29, 2021

It’s official! This year’s Pushcart Nominations have been signed, sealed, and delivered (or at least dropped off at the USPS)!! 

Each year editors of small book presses, magazines, and journals are invited to nominate six pieces of poetry, short stories, essays, memoirs or stand-alone excerpts from novels. Pieces published (or scheduled to be published) between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021 are eligible which for us meant work from Issues #3, #4, and #5. We’re excited to announce the following nominations:

Congratulations and best of luck write on!

Cheers,
The Good Life Review Team

Categories
interviews

Author Q & A with Brian Yapko

Author Q & A with Brian Yapko

November 23, 2021

This week’s Q & A is with Brian Yapko. Brian is a lawyer who lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico with his husband, Jerry, and their canine child, Bianca. His piece appearing in the Autumn 2021 issue of The Good Life Review is a poem titled “Truth at the Delicatessen.” 

We asked Brian to tell us some unique or surprising detail about the origin, drafting, and/or final version of his poem. 

His Response: “Truth at the Delicatessen” springs from my experiences in the 1990s working as a pro bono lawyer for gay men. I had the unbelievably sad task of writing up wills for men in their 20s and 30s who had contracted AIDS and were dying. For many of these men the worst thing they had to do was tell their parents and families. Those were terrible days which have never quite left me. 

Expanding on that thought with the next question regarding what writing the poem taught him about himself or craft or life in general he wrote: Through writing this poem I felt I was able to honor a number of young men who never saw 40 but who accepted their fates with courage and even a touch of gallows humor. 

We also asked Brian what fuels his desire to write.

His response: I must have a voice! As someone who has practiced law for many years I have a long history of trying to be persuasive. When it comes to poetry and stories I get to persuade people – not to vote guilty or innocent – but to look at a situation or idea or person in a new way. Helping people consider things from another angle – including myself – is hugely satisfying. That’s how compassion is born.

And finally, one of the questions we asked all contributors to respond to is what they think of when they hear the phrase “The Good Life?” 

Brian’s Response: “The Good Life” to me means being content in who I am, who I’m with and what I do. I’m not concerned about wealth or property or power or prestige. I’m talking about having the best husband I could have ever hoped for. I’m talking about a canine child named Bianca who we rescued and who, in turn, rescued us. Health. Friends, I am beyond grateful for what I have in my life. When I think of “The Good Life” I think how fortunate I am that this is precisely what I have. 

Brian’s poems have appeared in many literary journals and publications including Tofu Ink, Sparks of Calliope, KAIROS, Gyroscope Review, Penumbra, the Society of Classical Poets, Grand Little Things, Chained Muse, and elsewhere. His first novel – El Nuevo Mundo – is going to be published by Rebel Satori Press in the Summer of 2022. It is a gay themed science fiction story with an apocalyptic background which takes place in his home town of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the year 2062. 


Thanks, Brian, for being a part of our 5th issue and for participating in this Q & A!

Cheers,
~The Good Life Review Team